HAJI'S LIST

DPP Haji defends Kinoti, Sudi says DCI is being used

In Summary

• DPP says individuals don't act for communities but self 

• MP says they have been scheming all manner of things and even plans to kill him cannot be ruled out

Deputy President William Ruto and other leaders arrive for a thanksgiving event of John Chikati and Mbakalo MCA Bethwel Mwambu in Tongaren, Bungoma County
CORNERED? Deputy President William Ruto and other leaders arrive for a thanksgiving event of John Chikati and Mbakalo MCA Bethwel Mwambu in Tongaren, Bungoma County
Image: DPPS

Kapseret MP Oscar Sudi has dismissed the DPP Noordin Haji’s publicised breakdown of graft list by ethnic groups.

The list was meant to end the claims that the graft war targets Kalenjins.

The DPP had sought to prove DP William Ruto’s allies wrong and assure that the anti-corruption war targets thieves and not a community.

But Sudi said the figures were fake and made up by DCI George Kinoti to hoodwink the public that Kikuyus top the list of those charged with corruption.

In what brings a fresh twist to the politicised war on graft, he claimed Deputy President William Ruto’s political enemies had hatched a plot to assassinate him if the scheme to portray him as corrupt does not succeed.

Haji unveiled the list on Wednesday night in an interview on Citizen TV, reiterating that no community is targeted - just thieves.

The ‘controversial list’ shows that the highest number of suspects are Kikuyus at 141 followed by Luos at 56.

Kalenjins are third with 46 of them being suspects. Their elected leaders have been crying foul that the escalated fight against corruption is to settle political scores ahead of the 2022 elections.

The list of graft suspects shows that the Kisii are 37, the Swahili 34, Kamba 31 and Luhyas 29.

The Indian community has 15 while the Aembu are five.

Sudi said the list was “manufactured by DCI George Kinoti to confuse Kenyans seeking the truth”. He said they are aware that those behind the list will not stop at anything, including assassinating Ruto.

“They have been scheming all manner of things and we know even plans to kill him cannot be ruled out,” he told the Star by phone. 

Asked if he was aware of the seriousness of such claims, Sudi said Ruto’s adversaries were determined to stop him from taking over the presidency in 2022.

“We know that list is fake and the DPP should not speak for Kinoti who is the main culprit in the scheme to taint William Ruto as corrupt,” the lawmaker said.

But in his presentation, Haji asked Kenyans to appreciate that the individuals in court have cases based on evidence from which the courts will arrive at a decision.

He said it is unfortunate that people are politicising the war on graft yet it is clear that those who have violated the law must face the consequences.

“When you talk about corruption, the communities don’t benefit anything. They are the biggest losers,” Haji said, adding that the stolen monies have been wasted.

Ruto’s allies have over time accused the investigative agencies of politicising the war on graft by targeting the Kalenjin community.

They cite the cases involving sacked Kenya Power CEOs Ken Tarus and Ben Chumo, Kenya Pipeline’s Joe Sang. They are now also tagging Treasury Cabinet Secretary Henry Rotich.

If we are fighting corruption, it must be on the basis of truth. It must not be about the politics of targeting others. It must not target any project and we must be clear as a nation where we want to go … If we want to play politics, let’s play politics. If we want to fight corruption, let’s fight corruption
DP William Ruto

“If we are fighting corruption, it must be on the basis of truth. It must not be about the politics of targeting others. It must not target any project and we must be clear as a nation where we want to go … If we want to play politics, let’s play politics. If we want to fight corruption, let’s fight corruption,” Ruto said a few days ago.

Two more ministers faced the DCI yesterday to shed more light on their involvement in the said projects.

Kerio Valley Development Authority (KVDA) managing director David Kimosop was also questioned for two days.

KVDA is the state agency implementing the two dams under investigation.

Sudi stirred the debate on graft war targeting Kalenjins at a funeral in Kakamega on March 3.

He argued that the probe was designed to terminate the dam projects in Elgeyo Marakwet county with a view to hauling officials from the region to the courts.

Governors Stephen Sang (Nandi), Joyce Laboso (Bomet), and Senator Samson Cherargei are among Rift Valley leaders opposed to the DCI’s investigations. “I want to say, we are seeing bad signs.

We are seeing our person being persecuted. He is being treated as though he never worked. And all of us know the work William [Ruto] has done. He traversed the whole country [campaigning], but if you look at how he is being treated now …” Laboso protested.

But Haji told Ruto allies that communities do not sit in the offices of the graft suspects.

“I understand African communities are about Ubuntu but we must draw a line since there is no way communities can defend individuals who are implicated in corruption.”

The DPP said he is not moved by the politics as he stands with the law as guided by the fidelity to the Constitution, non-bias on grounds of religion or tribe and application of the rule of law.

“The principle of presumption of innocence is what guides us. Anything else is a fabrication and an attempt to discredit our work,” he said. On the dam contracts, the DPP said he will proceed with the investigations – including involving overseas agencies, despite the sentiments arising from it.

He said the agency will concentrate on tracing the monies suspected to be stashed abroad, hence the involvement of the host countries to help trace the loot.

The Arror and Kimwarer dams contract was awarded to CMC Di Ravenna, an Italian company.

Works are yet to start amid reports the contractor has filed for bankruptcy and may not execute the projects. The DPP also reiterated that he will not put his eyes away from the call for those implicated in graft must step aside.

Haji said, “There is something wrong with our society. We need to evaluate our morals. The war on corruption is much more than what people think. The money involved in our cases is mind-boggling. We are a wealthy country but a lot of our resources are lost through ventures that are not viable. We are talking about people taking over 70 per cent of what is allocated for projects.”