Kenya seeks part of climate change fund

Environment PS Charles Sunkuli speaks on overcoming drought in a function at the UN, Nairobi, yesterday /IVY NJERI
Environment PS Charles Sunkuli speaks on overcoming drought in a function at the UN, Nairobi, yesterday /IVY NJERI

Kenya is among several African countries fighting tooth and nail to secure funds aimed at lessening the gravity of climate change. The Sh10 trillion is up for grabs by developing countries, as the Paris Agreement is set to enter into force.

The European Parliament voted on October 4 to ratify the Paris Agreement. The ratification document was deposited the same week at the UN, which will enable the Paris Agreement to take effect 30 days later – in time for COP22 in Marrakech, Morocco. This means developing countries will get $100 billion (Sh10.1 trillion) climate funding every year until 2025. The funds will help turn the world into a zero-carbon, climate-resilient future.

The National Environment Management Authority has urged organisations to submit proposals to secure funds towards mitigating and adapting to climate change.

In March, Nema joined a respected global list of 33 institutions accredited by the Green Climate Fund after nomination from the National Treasury. This makes an entry point of funds to Kenya for mitigation of climate change.

Ayub Macharia, the Nema director for environmental education, information and public participation, said Kenya wants as many proposals as possible to secure the funding.

“It is intended to provide funding to developing countries to limit the impacts of climate change, taking into account the needs of those developing countries particularly vulnerable to the adverse effects of climate change,” he said.

Macharia urged all counties to hand in proposals.

The Paris Agreement makes it clear that developed countries will continue to provide and mobilise finance to support developing countries.