3,057 killed in road accidents last year, says NTSA report

RISE IN CRASHES: National Transport and Safety Authority director general Francis Meja in Nairobi yesterday.
RISE IN CRASHES: National Transport and Safety Authority director general Francis Meja in Nairobi yesterday.

Three thousand people died in road accidents last year, representing an increase of 5.2 per cent from 2014.

The National Transport and Safety Authority road safety status report 2015 shows that 3,057 died last year compared to 2,907 in 2014.

The report shows that pedestrians killed last year slightly increased from 1,340 in 2014 to 1,344 in 2015.

Some 339 drivers died in 2015 compared to 268 in 2014, an increase of 26.49 per cent.

Motorcycles killed 637 in 2015 compared to 553 in 2014, representing a 15 per cent increase.

The report, released at Panafric Hotel, shows that 668 passengers died in 2015 while 642 died in 2014, a four per cent increase.

A further 304 died countrywide December last alone compared to 270 in December 2014, with the most productive aged between 20 and 44 years and peak age being 30-34.

NTSA director general Francis Meja yesterday said crashes continue to have enormous social economic impact.

“We need road safety integrated into other sectors of the economy just like HIV and Aids,” Meja said.

He was with board chairman Lee Kinyanjui.

Curriculum review, introduction of smart driving licence and lobbying for more funds are some of the areas the authority is looking at.

In Kenya, it is estimated that crashes cause a loss of 5.6 per cent of the national GDP.

High population, increase in number of vehicles and the improved road networks increases the risks.

Nairobi county registered the highest fatalities with more than 20 deaths per 100,000 population, followed by Nakuru and Taita Taveta with 17 and 15 respectively.

Lamu had the lowest fatality.

In 2014, PSVs contributed to 42 per cent of road carnage.

This was however reversed by interventions by the authority that saw private cars contribute 35 per cent compared to PSVs’ 20 per cent last year.