CONSPIRACY?

Suspension of Parliamentary sittings meant to siphon Covid-19 funds: MP Ali

Said certain individuals are trying to benefit from funds set for Covid-19.

In Summary

• National Assembly Speaker Justin Muturi and his Senate counterpart Ken Lusaka informed the legislatures through a notice that special sittings which were to be held this week were suspended.

• Ali has further dismissed as rumours that a number of MPs have tested positive for the pandemic virus.

Members of parliament and senate at the parliament gallery during the opening of the 11th parliament.
Members of parliament and senate at the parliament gallery during the opening of the 11th parliament.
Image: FILE

Nyali MP Mohammed Ali has raised concern over the reason behind the suspension of both Senate and National Assembly special sittings.

The MP said some individuals are trying to benefit from the funds set aside to help in fighting the novel coronavirus.

“Someone wants to continue bypassing the constitution to siphon funds meant for coronavirus,” Ali said.

 

National Assembly Speaker Justin Muturi and his Senate counterpart Ken Lusaka informed the legislatures through a notice that special sittings which were to be held this week were suspended.

“In the circumstances, it has, therefore, become necessary to inform you that it will not be possible to hold the sittings of the Houses of Parliament as scheduled until further notice. The leadership of the two Houses is consulting and shall advise on the means by which urgent business that is before the Houses of Parliament shall be transacted remotely,” the memo from the speakers reads.

The suspension came after President Uhuru Kenyatta’s address to the nation on Monday regarding measures to curb Covid-19.

During the address, the President declared the cessation of movement in and out of Nairobi, Kilifi, Kwale and Mombasa counties for 21 days.

Ali has further dismissed rumours as that a number of MPs have tested positive for the pandemic virus.

 “.....Leak fake info of 17 MP’s then have a reason not to allow parliament to resume.” Ali said.

 
 
 
 

He added that suspending sittings was fueled by fake information so that the concerned individuals can take over roles of the National Assembly.

Siaya Senator James Orengo also opposed the suspension saying that the Constitution and the rule of law have to apply even as the country continues to fight the virus.

"It is regrettable that the Speakers of both Houses of the Parliament have suspended lawfully confined sittings of the National Assembly and the Senate," Orengo said.

Orengo added that the President's guidelines needed enactment of certain legislative measures.

Both houses were expected to transact critical pieces of legislation which were to further cushion Kenyans from the virus.

The country has so far reported 172 cases with six deaths.

Seven people have recovered from the virus but the Ministry of Health has asked Kenyans to brace themselves and prepare for the worst.