COVID-19 IMPACT

Careers shattered with Olympics cancellation - Eliud Kipchoge

Says he will defend his title in 2021 and is looking forward to witnessing the event.

In Summary

• The Tokyo Olympics were postponed on Tuesday to 2021, the first such delay in the modern games’ 124-year history.

• This was to contain the spread of coronavirus that has hit the globe.

Eliud Kipchoge wins men's elite race
THE GREATEST: Eliud Kipchoge wins men's elite race
Image: REUTERS

Olympic Champion Eliud Kipchoge has said the postponement of this year's Tokyo Olympics in Japan has shuttered many careers.

The Tokyo Olympics were postponed on Tuesday to 2021, the first such delay in the modern games’ 124-year history.

This was to contain the spread of coronavirus that has hit the globe.

 
 

The death toll now remains at over 16,000. Kenya has confirmed 25 positive cases of Covid-19.

 
 
 

"It has been hard for others since they have been training day and night. Olympics is an important event for people. Careers have been shattered. This cancellation affects all lives," he said.

"The mere fact that you can have a medal to hang on your neck from the Olympics and that you were a participant is an excitement to wait for."

Speaking to CNN on Wednesday, Kipchoge asked his colleagues to accept these hard times and support the world in fighting Covid-19.

"They should just continue training for next year. They will have a chance. We need to accept and support the various leaderships," he said.

He noted that he will defend his title in 2021 adding that he is looking forward to witnessing a wonderful event.

"All in all it was a very wise decision to postpone the Olympics until 2021. I look forward to coming back to Japan to defend my Olympic title next year and look forward to witnessing a wonderful event," he said.

 

"I wish everybody good health in these challenging times."

 
 

Kipchoge noted that the postponement of the London was also unfortunate.

"In the world, anything can happen. All we have to do is accept and move on," he said.

Tokyo 2020 organising committee chief executive Toshiro Muto said that it was not clear who would pay the extra costs arising from the postponement.

Japan has put up $12 billion to host the 2020 Olympics.


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