GENDER IMBALANCE

Busia picks team to study challenges of adult education

The number of women enrolling for studies is more than double that of men, but are tardy class attenders

In Summary

• Data shows that there are 2,656 adult learners in the county.

• Out of these, 1,999 are women and 657 are men.

Busia Education and Vocational Training chief officer Dan Mogoria.
Busia Education and Vocational Training chief officer Dan Mogoria.
Image: EMOJONG OSERE

The Busia administration has formed a task force to establish the challenges of adult education in the county.  

Education and Vocational Training chief officer Dan Mogoria told the Star they want to understand why more women are enrolling than men, yet are inconsistent in class attendance. 

“Right now we do not have a scientific report to tell us why more women are enrolling. We also don’t know why the percentage of men attending classes is higher,” Mogoria said on the phone.

Mogoria said that when the task force completes its work in two months, they will have all the answers. 

Vocational training director Leonard Opollo said the high number of women enrolling was because of the changing economic dynamics in the country.

"By acquiring knowledge, they acquire skills for self-employment or formal employment," he told the Star.

Data from the department of Adult Education show that the number of women joining adult education training centres is more than double that of men.

The data shows that there are 2,656 adult learners in the county. Out of these, 1,999 are women and 657 are men.

There are 109 adult education centres in the seven subcounties of Busia.

Some 40.5 per cent of the men (266) attend daily classes compared to 33.3 per cent (665) of the women, the data shows.

The Directorate of Adult and Education says some of the challenges adult learners face include working schedules that clash with classes. 

(edited by O. Owino)