COMMUNAL VIOLENCE

State begins forceful mop up of guns in Transmara, Narok

Enorateet-Nkararo border has been the epicentre of raging battles for more than 40 years.

In Summary
  • Subcounty commissioner Hassan Noor said the time  given to the two factions to surrender guns had elapsed.
  •  By Tuesday only nine guns had been surrendered to the authorities, Noor told the Star. 
A house destroyed during clan violence in Transmara West
CLAN VIOLENCE: A house destroyed during clan violence in Transmara West
Image: MAGATI OBEBO

Security agencies deployed to quell fighting in Transmara West, Narok county, have been ordered to start a forceful mopping up of guns from Siria and Uasin Gishu militias. 

Subcounty commissioner Hassan Noor said the time given to the two factions to surrender guns had elapsed.

 

By Tuesday only nine guns had been surrendered to the authorities, Noor told the Star. 

 

"We strongly believe there are more arms in the wrong hands. They must be surrendered if the region is to have lasting peace," Noor said. 

Since the deployment of GSU and Anti-Stock Theft police units to the region, calm has returned, with farmers going back to their farms. 

The Enorateet-Nkararo border has been the epicentre of raging battles over boundary demarcation for more than 40 years. 

During the latest flareups, more than six people, among them a secondary school student, were killed.  

An elder from Uasin Gishu was killed by gun-totting youths from Siria clan who swept through the neighbourhoods of Enkopeleny villages torching houses. More than 60 houses were torched during the skirmishes. 

Dozens of women, especially among the Uasin Gishu clan, have been widowed along the fertile valleys following the constant violence between the warring youths. 

Noor said guns in wrong hands were to blame for the unending circle of violence in the region. He said once the guns were mopped up, the conflict would end. 

The security agents deployed to carry out the disarmament will not leave till all the guns are repossessed and destroyed, the administrator said.

 "We are already keeping watch that nobody runs away with any gun," Noor told the Star by phone.

Keiyan MCA Mark Muktut said more than 200 guns could still be in the hands of the wrong people.

 He, however, appealed to the security agencies carrying out the exercise to do so in a humane way.

 "We will still experience anarchy in years to come if these guns will not be mopped up" he told the Star by phone. 

He asked any youths from the two clans with a gun to surrender it to the authorities. 

"If you don't want to experience the wrath of the government,  give it out to the security agencies," he said. 

Edited by Henry Makori