EMPOWERMENT

Disabled youths in Homa Bay trained for self-reliance

The training is done both online using a digital tablet and face-to-face.

In Summary
  • The tablets are installed with programmes showing videos and still pictures of how each of the learning areas is undertaken.
  • The technical skills include poultry keeping, carpentry, embroidery, plumbing and welding.
Homa Bay disability service officer Ruth Oyier trains a youth on how to make embroidery at Sikri TTVC in Kasipul constituency on October 17, 2020
TRAINING: Homa Bay disability service officer Ruth Oyier trains a youth on how to make embroidery at Sikri TTVC in Kasipul constituency on October 17, 2020
Image: ROBERT OMOLLO

Youths living with disability in Homa Bay have been identified to undertake a digital learning programme to enable them become job creators.

 

Sense International organisation in partnership with Sikri Technical and Vocational Training College in Kasipul constituency is training 75 youths who are deaf and blind.

The organisation supports them with technical skills.

The skills include poultry keeping, carpentry, embroidery, plumbing and welding among others.

The training is done both online using a digital tablet and face-to-face. Each of the youths has been given a tablet.

The tablets are installed with programmes showing videos and still pictures of how each of the learning areas is undertaken.

The training is done both at the college and in the youths’ homes.

Sense International Kenya director Edwin Osundwa, Homa Bay MCA Edwin Kakach, Sikri TVTC principal Evans Oyoo and Homa Bay disability service officer Ruth Oyier launched the programme.

 
 

Speaking at the college on Saturday, Osundwa said the programme is aimed at enabling youths to learn, work and earn money.

He said they began the programme after realising that there were many economic gaps which can be filled by people who have technical skills.

He said the initiative will enable the youths to be independent in earning a living.

“Jobs such as carpentry, basket making, poultry rearing and others can significantly transform lives of youths but they are usually not taught in schools. The programme will enable youths with complex disabilities be self-reliant financially,” Osundwa said.

“The tablets will enable the youths to market their products both in Kenya and internationally, hence contribute to economic growth,” he added.

Kakach said the programme promotes the realisation of Vision 2030.

“Industrialisation is significant in economic development. We hope the programme will enable many disabled youths to become job creators,” Kakach said.

He urged parents to shun the practice of hiding children with disability.

“Let parents take their children with disability to vocational training centres instead of hiding them,” Kakach said.

Oyoo said the project will cushion the youths with disability from the rejection some of them face in society.

“Some youths with multiple disability suffer rejection in society because of dependence. We’re changing this by making them productive to start earning a living based on their skills,” Oyoo said.

Edited by Henry Makori