WORLD WATER AND ENVIRONMENT DAY

Eucalyptus order still in force, says Ongwae

Eucalyptus is considered a thirsty tree as it absorbs a lot of water.

In Summary
  • The governor issued an executive order in March last year for all eucalyptus trees in water catchment areas and riparian land to be cut down. 
  • Says with its fast-rising population, Kisii now requires millions of litres of water per day.
Eucalyptus trees.
THIRSTY TREES: Eucalyptus trees.
Image: COURTESY

River levels in Kisii have begun to rise since the felling of eucalyptus trees in water catchment areas started, Governor James Ongwae has said. 

The governor issued an executive order in March last year for all eucalyptus trees in water catchment areas and riparian land to be cut down. 

Ongwae said the order is still in force. He said water sources must be protected at all costs as humans cannot survive without water. 

Eucalyptus is considered a thirsty tree as it absorbs a lot of water. 
 

 

Speaking during an interview with a vernacular radio station on Saturday evening, Ongwae said rivers whose levels have started to rise include Nyakomisaro, Nyanchwa and Chirichiro.

“I'm reminding those who do not want to cut eucalyptus trees from water catchment and riparian areas the executive order I issued is still in force,” Ongwae said.

“They should start cutting the trees before the county government cuts them at their own cost.” 

The world marked Water and Environment Day on March 22.

Ongwae said with its fast-rising population, Kisii now requires millions of litres of water per day.

He said when completed, Kegati water project will supply 27 million litres per day compared to the current six million.

 

He said his administration is working with the national government to build a water station at Bomachoge Borabu.

Edited by Josephine M. Mayuya