ADULT EDUCATION NEEDED

Why does my child wear gunny bag? — Kisii parent

Parents, especially illiterate ones, don't understand the new CBC programme, can't help children

In Summary

• Children wear gunny bags and clean market centres as part of practical learning and understanding environmental protection. But parents don't get it.

• Adult education to be aligned with new CBC so parents can help their children.

 

Kiangungi Primary School in Embu East Grade 3 pupils sweeping Kiangungi Shopping Centre as a CBC assessment.
GUNNY BAG CLEAN-UP: Kiangungi Primary School in Embu East Grade 3 pupils sweeping Kiangungi Shopping Centre as a CBC assessment.
Image: MARTIN FUNDI

Some Kisii parents don't know why their children sometimes wear gunny bags and clean market centres as part of the new Competency-Based Curriculum. 

And they think it's a waste of time to help them with their homework and answer questions.

Especially if parents are illiterate. 

County Director of Adult Education Tobias Osogo said on Thursday there's a gap in parental education about the new CBC.

 Sogo said a number of parents, especially the illiterate, do not understand how the new system works and thus do not take time to assist their children.

Due to the misunderstanding, Sogo said these parents question why their Grade 3 children sometimes wear gunny bags instead of uniforms and clean market centres.

“Wearing gunny bags is part of their practical work in the CBC. They need to understand that environmental education is practical,” he said.

He said that in order for the CBC to succeed, parents, teachers and the pupils should play their roles.

The director said some of the parents consider it a waste of time when their children ask for help on their homework or when they ask questions.

“I urge illiterate parents to register with the adult education programme if they want to understand how the new system works,” he said.

Sogo said adult education will be realigned to the new system. This will help parents play their roles to realise children's potential, he said.

 

He said that there must be a strong link between literacy and CBC; that's why illiterate parents make the implementation of the system difficult.

Sogo said his department enrolled 205 men and 193 female who will sit this year’s KCPE and another 14 men and two women will sit the KCSE.

He said there are problems in meeting increased numbers of adults, including a shortage of teaching staff, inadequate learning materials, poor funding and lack of ownership of the programme.

(Edited by V. Graham)