WORLD DIABETES WEEK

Adopt healthy lifestyles to reduce risk of diseases, residents urged

Non-communicable diseases attributed to poor eating and lifestyle habits

In Summary

'We should think of going back to our traditional foods that don’t have chemicals as opposed to the modern foods that are grown using chemicals'

Garissa residents undergo screening for diabetes on Wednesday, November 27, 2019
COMBATING LIFESTYLE DISEASES: Garissa residents undergo screening for diabetes on Wednesday, November 27, 2019
Image: STEPHEN ASTARIKO

 

Garissa residents have been urged to adopt healthy lifestyles to combat non-communicable diseases, including cancer and diabetes.

Health executive Ahmed Omar said an active and healthy lifestyle was one of the surest ways of keeping at bay the risk of contracting lifestyle diseases.

He was speaking on Wednesday when he led the county and partners to a session of indoor football in Garissa as part of events to mark the World Diabetes Week.

Some 100 people were sensitised on the occasion which was characterised by activities, including screening for blood pressure and tests for cholesterol and BMI among others.

"The increasing incidents of diabetes can be attributed to poor lifestyles, changing food habits and prevalence of obesity. This day serves as a stark reminder to combat the epidemic of diabetes through a multi-pronged approach that includes prevention through awareness, diagnosis and treatment," Omar said.

Resident Abdi Mohamed said modern lifestyle is to blame for the increased cases of chronic diseases and urged for a change.

“We should think of going back to our traditional foods that don’t have chemicals as opposed to the modern foods that are grown using chemicals,” Mohamed said.

At the weekend, cardiologist from Aga Khan University Hospital in Nairobi expressed alarm over the high rate of heart diseases after all the 120 people screened were found with conditions.

Dr. Mzee Ngunga called for an active and healthy lifestyle, saying it was the surest way to prevent diseases like diabetes, hypertension, obesity and cardiovascular conditions.

 

edited by p. obuya