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SIGNED RETURN-TO-WORK FORMULA

Mandera doctors resume duty after six days strike

In Summary

• The doctors had complained of poor working conditions, overdue promotions and not being allowed to pursue postgraduate studies.

• Eda had earlier described their demands as 'unreasonable, unrealistic and calculated to sabotage health services in Mandera'

Mandera Health executive Mohamed Aden in Mandera town
HEALTH: Mandera Health executive Mohamed Aden in Mandera town
Image: STEPHEN ASTARIKO

Doctors in Mandera ended their six-day work boycott on Wednesday evening after striking a deal with the county administration.

The health workers started the strike last Thursday. Their union leaders had issued a two-week notice.

The medics had accused the county government of failing to implement the collective bargaining agreement signed in 2017.

       The doctors had complained of poor working conditions, overdue promotions and not being allowed to pursue postgraduate studies. 

Health executive Mohamed Eda had earlier described their demands as "unreasonable, unrealistic and calculated to sabotage health services in Mandera".

But on Wednesday he told the Star on the phone that the county administration had struck a deal with the doctors.

“We have agreed on everything. We have agreed that they seek audience with us so that we can solve the problem amicably without disrupting services,” he said.

Northeastern Kenya Medical Practitioners, Pharmacists and Dentist Union (KMPDU) secretary Dr Ibrahim Maalim also confirmed that they had reached an agreement with the county government.

He said the contentious issues, including the promotion of doctors, had been sorted out.

“I want to confirm that we have reached a consensus and signed a return-to-work formula with the county. Going forward, we are reading from the same script,” he told the Star on the phone.

 

A doctor who was part of the negotiations, but who did not want to be named because he is not authorised to speak to the media, said the county promised to sort out remuneration and other allowances issues after consulting with the Salaries and Remuneration Commission (SRC).

The county has been facing a shortage of medical staff and efforts to get more flopped last month. This was after the executive challenged the recruitment of new doctors, following complaints of favouritism and corruption from some applicants who missed out on the shortlist.

Edited by A. Ndung'u