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NATIONAL HYGIENE PROGRAMME

World Bank lauds Kazi Mtaani for crime reduction in city

It benefits 53,733 youths and 1,791 supervisors in Mathare, Kibera, Mukuru and Korogocho

In Summary

• Kazi Mtaani was rolled out by President Kenyatta on April 25 as an economic stimulus to mitigate the adverse effects Covid-19 in slums.

• The funds have spurred local economies, leading to improved livelihoods for the residents of the participating informal settlements.

Gatwikira youths in Kibera clear garbage under the Kazi Mtaani programme on July 16.
CLEANUP: Gatwikira youths in Kibera clear garbage under the Kazi Mtaani programme on July 16.
Image: MERCY MUMO

The World Bank has commended the National Hygiene Programme, popularly known as Kazi Mtaani, for reducing crime and drug abuse in the informal settlements.

The programme, the global lender noted, has also reduced youth dependency on other people and improved livelihoods.

"Cumulatively, the funds have helped spur the local economies leading to improved livelihoods for the residents of the participating informal settlements,” the WB said in a statement to newsrooms on Wednesday. 

Kazi Mtaani was rolled out by President Uhuru Kenyatta on April 25 as an economic stimulus for informal settlements to mitigate the adverse effects Covid-19.

It benefits 53,733 youths and 1,791 supervisors in Mathare, Kibera, Mukuru and Korogocho informal settlements.

The government pays the youths Sh560 million per month. Each earns Sh455 daily, while supervisors take home Sh505, according to the State Department of Housing and Urban Development.

“The benefits accruing from this programme are essential to building the resilience of informal settlement dwellers both during the pandemic and after,” the World Bank said.

Countrywide, the programme employs more than 280,000 youths.

Byron Mashu, from Kibera is grateful to the government for the programme. "It not only enables us to fend for our families and settle our bills, but also ensures we are less idle as we are engaged at work during the day, minimising crime in our area.”  

Kazi Mtaani has kept the 18-35 age category youths engaged in constructive work in their localities. They build access roads, open drainages, plant trees and collect garbage.

“We have seen the reduction of petty crimes and dependency on other people and our environs are clean,” Don Dante, a youth leader from Mukuru kwa Njenga said, noting that he and many others can now afford to feed their families.

He hoped to see more of such "opportunities for a better Kenya”.

Phase Two of Kazi Mtaani was launched in July with a focus on sustainable work in public spaces like schools, libraries, toilets, footpaths, painting and paving roads with cobblestones.

 

 

- mwaniki fm