STIGMA RIFE

Many PWDs in Meru face stigma, torture from parents

South Imenti coordinator says children with disabilities need to be taken to schools to learn skills for self reliance

In Summary
  • Some 320 people were selected from 47 groups in Imenti South and Central and benefitted from Kinoti’s donations.
  • South Imenti PWDs coordinator Lilian Kathambi said many parents are yet to accept disability is not inability.
Kinoti GK
Kinoti GK
Image: GERALD MUTETHIA

For Ruth Kiende, growing up as a special needs child was difficult as she was stigmatised by not just the society but also his parents. 

Kiende says despite being disabled, her parents never bothered to take care of her by taking her to school for empowerment and become self reliant but instead  kicked him out of their home at some point.

She grew up alone and depended on well-wishers for her upkeep, food and clothing.

“I thank God I am alive today. My parents chased me from home. I had no food, no clothes. My being alive today is a miracle. I am grateful to those who took care of me. I can now rent my own house,” Kiende said when she received some Christmas food stuff from Nkubu-based businessman Kinoti GK.

Some 320 people were selected from 47 groups in Imenti South and Central and benefitted from Kinoti’s donations.

South Imenti PWDs coordinator Lilian Kathambi said many parents are yet to accept disability is not inability.

She said if children with disability are taken to school at an early age, they will get empowered and learn skills to help them be self reliant.

“We have a challenge and need to talk to parents who have children with disabilities because many of them do not bother taking them to school or hospital. Many of these children face stigma. Some are chained and abandoned. We are doing all that is necessary to register all PWDs into organised groups so that they can get help from well-wishers and not begging on the streets,” Kathambi said.

She appealed to politicians to be considerate of PWDs, offer them empowerment opportunities and startup businesses capital rather than wait to misuse them during the electioneering period.

Kinoti said helping the vulnerable in society is a humanity calling, adding that his philanthropy is inspired by John Wesley, the founder of Methodist Churches.

“We do this every year. Sharing does not mean one is very rich, all one needs is a giving heart to help those who are less fortunate,” Kinoti said.

 

 

 

-Edited by SKanyara