SWEET DIVIDEND

Taita Taveta beekeepers get help from Slovakia

An estimated 700 farmers across the county engage in bee-keeping.

In Summary

•The programme aims to improve honey production.

•Slovak Ambassador Frantisêk Dlhopolcêk said the programme will start next year.

A beekeeper in Kenyan self-help group.
SWEET BUSINESS A beekeeper in Kenyan self-help group.
Image: FILE:

Beekeepers in Taita Taveta county will receive training and beehives in a joint programme with the Slovak government to improve quality and increase honey production.

Slovakia Ambassador Frantisêk Dlhopolcêk said the programme will start next year in cooperation with the Taita Taveta government.

“Once you provide the training, then the embassy will get money to provide beehives,” he added. 

The envoy said Kenyan farmers lacked knowledge of appropriate honey production techniques, thus lose money. He was paying a courtesy call on Governor Granton Samboja.

The ambassador said empowering beekeepers will increase their income, improve food security and create more jobs.

“The Slovak government wants to encourage many people to venture into farming, especially beekeeping," Dlhopolcêk said.

About 700 farmers are beekeepers in Taita Taveta. The region has a high potential for honey production due to its vase area and semi-arid climate.

Samboja said more funds will be allocated to the agriculture department to facilitate extension services and increase beekeeping. The county will partner with various development stakeholders to books agriculture, water and education, he said.

“My government is scouting for partners in water and sanitation, education and libraries and last but not least the critical areas of agriculture and irrigation,” Samboja said.

The Slovak said the partnership with the county already has enabled more than  30,000 students to receive entrepreneurship training over four years. It has also incubated 30 start-ups under the Sote Hub enterprise programme.

(Edited by V. Graham)