[VIDEO] British terror suspect Grant loses appeal against 9-year sentence

Briton Jermaine Grant at the Mombasa law court on Thursday where the court of appeal upheld his nine years sentence.Photo/BY MALEMBA MKONGO
Briton Jermaine Grant at the Mombasa law court on Thursday where the court of appeal upheld his nine years sentence.Photo/BY MALEMBA MKONGO

A Briton who was jailed for nine years will serve his term after a court of appeal declined to overturn the sentence.

Jermaine Grant was found guilty of obtaining registration documents by false pretense. He wanted to acquire a birth certificate and a Kenyan ID card.

Justice Alnashir Visram said Grant’s appeal was dismissed because it lacked merit.

Grant, from London, was arrested in 2011 on accusations of plotting terror attacks. He was jailed in December 2015.

He also faced separate charges of “conspiring to improvise an explosive device.” He denied the terror charges.

He was arrested after batteries and chemicals were discovered in his apartment in Mombasa.

UK police - who have provided forensic assistance to Kenyan authorities - alleged the chemicals were “precursors for making highly volatile explosive substances”.

The sentencing of Grant cames after Mombasa High Court judge Martin Muya overturned an earlier acquittal on the citizenship charges.

“I order that the accused serves one year of imprisonment on each of the nine counts,” Muya said.

Addressing Grant, Muya said: “This sentence will run consecutively, which means you will serve a total of nine years’ imprisonment.”

Grant contested that sentence at the Court of Appeal.

Visram said the sentence was justified because the crimes were committed at different times and in different locations.

He said evidence was well corroborated by witnesses.

Muya said the prosecution, led by state counsel Jami Yamina, had provided concrete evidence against Grant in the nine counts of attempting to illegally acquire Kenyan citizenship.

Grant procured a fake birth certificate and a Kenyan primary school leaving certificate.

He had initially been acquitted by resident magistrate Anastacia Ndung’u before the acquittal was appealed by the Director of Public Prosecutions.

In his appeal, Grant said Muya erred by overturning Ndung’u’s decision.

He said the court ought to have re-evaluated the evidence. He also held that Muya misinterpreted the law in convicting him.

Visram, however, said the appellate court found no mistakes in Muya’s decision.