EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING

Zetech prepares graduates with business mindset, says dean

Says graduates should be agents of change and problem solvers in business, management and society.

In Summary

• Kibas said Zetech University has adopted a progressive mode of delivering its programmes.

• Prof Kibas said the urgent call to review business education and to develop a curriculum to incorporate these issues cannot be delayed.

TOtosci Holdings Limited CEO Anthony Muthungu and Prof Peter Kibas at JKUAT
TOtosci Holdings Limited CEO Anthony Muthungu and Prof Peter Kibas at JKUAT
Image: John Kamau

Zetech University's School of Business and Economics is seeking to produce innovative and creative graduates with entrepreneurial mindsets.

The university says graduates should be agents of change and problem solvers in business, management and society at large.

Dean of the school Prof Peter Kibas said theirs is a unique school where  students, staff and faculty reinvent themselves through the continuous pursuit of knowledge, disseminating good practices and leading in bringing change to the communities and the world. 

"With an entrepreneurial mindset, thinking and research, members are expected to be change agents for communities and the country, continent and the world," he said.

Kibas said Zetech University has adopted a progressive mode of delivering its programmes.

“At Zetech, we focus more on experiential learning outside the classroom, emphasising entrepreneurship and innovation in all programmes and balancing learning-by-studying with learning-by-doing in an interactive industry-oriented approach,” he said.

Kibas said the changing dynamics in the world of business globally, in light of the emerging crises such as Covid-19 and others, accentuate the critical role of “soft skills” such as communication, teamwork, critical thinking, time management and organisational skills among others.

“Indeed, the emphasis is on skills that enhance positive human interaction, understanding, and meaningful relationships and not mere application or reproduction of knowledge," he said.

"Therefore, business education going forward must incorporate the development of emotional intelligence and social intelligence in self-awareness, integrity, and sustainability over and above knowledge in complex problem-solving skills.” 

Prof Kibas said the urgent call to review business education and to develop a curriculum to incorporate these issues cannot be delayed.

He said the university’s pioneering post-graduate programme, the Master of Business Administration, incorporates a fusion of academia and industry experience in its approach and content.

“The areas of specialisation in the MBA also deliberately blend into the critical demand areas of business management today,” he said.

Kibas said the MBA programme fits very well with progression for most of the undergraduate programmes.

“The progression is critical so that students doing various diplomas in areas such as business management, supply chain management, accounting and finance and human resource management do not become terminal but can instead transition,” he said.

 

 

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