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Well-wishers urged to setup centre for children with cerebral palsy

The facility will offer care and therapy to people with the condition

In Summary
  • Maina and Kariuki said the facility will help bring together parents and children with cerebral palsy where caregivers can come to offer their services.
  • The centre will enable the children to get therapy and spend time with others and give parents a chance to get psychosocial support and any other support as a group.
Members of CP Warriors Family, a CBO, perform a play during marking of the World Cerebral Palsy Day at Pan African Girls School in Karatina town, Nyeri, on Wednesday
Members of CP Warriors Family, a CBO, perform a play during marking of the World Cerebral Palsy Day at Pan African Girls School in Karatina town, Nyeri, on Wednesday
Image: EUTYCAS MUCHIRI
Families with people living with cerebral palsy receive diaper donations from well wisher during the marking of the World Cerebral Palsy Day at Pan African girls school in Karatina town, Nyeri, on Wednesday
Families with people living with cerebral palsy receive diaper donations from well wisher during the marking of the World Cerebral Palsy Day at Pan African girls school in Karatina town, Nyeri, on Wednesday
Image: EUTYCAS MUCHIRI

Two advocates for people living with cerebral palsy have called on well-wishers to help set up an intervention centre to offer care and therapy to people with the condition.

Nelson Maina and Esther Kariuki said the facility will help bring together parents and children with cerebral palsy where caregivers can come to offer their services.

Maina said people with the condition do not attend school and spend time at home and therefore the centre would be like a daycare centre.

“This centre would enable the children to get therapy and also spend time with others and give parents a chance to get psychosocial support and get any other assistance as a group,” he said.

Families with members living with cerebral palsy in Mathira constituency formed a Community Based Organisation called CP Warriors Family.

The CBO has 64 families.

Cerebral palsy advocates and the CBO officials are also exploring ways of coming up with reusable diapers to cut the expenses of buying diapers for many parents and caregivers with such children.

They spoke on Wednesday during the marking of the World Cerebral Palsy Day at Pan African Girls School in Karatina town, Nyeri county, where they held a diapers fund drive for children and adults with cerebral palsy.

“Buying diapers is very expensive for them and we are thinking of looking for a solution that is sustainable like having reusable diapers,” Maina said.

He said they are looking for a person who can come up with a design that can be done locally.

The marking of the World Cerebral Palsy Day also attracted families from various areas in Nyeri and the neighbouring counties, bringing together about 80 families.

Other stakeholders present included rotary clubs of Nyeri, Karatina, Parklands in Nairobi, the department of social services, Mukurwe-ini NG-CDF, friends and well-wishers who came together to mark the day.

Speakers said many children with the condition are hidden in their houses by family members and only those with other physical disabilities venture out.

They are assumed to be the people with the greater need than those with cerebral palsy and, consequently, the government always seems to respond to physical disability needs, they said.

“This is because some of these children (with cerebral palsy)  have to be carried on their parent’s back from place to place and so even when invited to such events, they are unable to attend,” Maina said.

As a result, he said the group has been trying to ensure they attend such events by providing them with transport and getting wheelchairs for them through the Walkabout Foundation, Nanyuki.

This is done through fundraising and taking them there where they are given customised wheelchairs enabling them to move around.

Other interventions include training parents for eight weeks in care, giving lessons to enable them to handle the children and give them therapy at home.

Kariuki said other than meeting the expenses of buying diapers and medication, parents undergo other challenges such as having to stay with their children at home as they cannot go to schools and facing rejections by the family members and ostracised by the community.

-Edited by SKanyara

DJ Winfred Wanjiku known by her stage name as DJ Wiwa, also a person living with cerebral palsy, in action during the marking of the World Cerebral Palsy Day at Pan African Girls School in Karatina town, Nyeri, on Wednesday
DJ Winfred Wanjiku known by her stage name as DJ Wiwa, also a person living with cerebral palsy, in action during the marking of the World Cerebral Palsy Day at Pan African Girls School in Karatina town, Nyeri, on Wednesday
Image: EUTYCAS MUCHIRI