FOREST CONSERVATION

Kinale residents want to plant crops in the forest

They plan to cultivate their crops and protect trees

In Summary
  • KFS and KDF plants over 25 hectares of Cider trees in Kinale forest in Kiambu.
  • Community under Pelis program to get pieces of cultivation land in the forest, as they help to cultivate and take care of trees planted.
Head of Central highlands conservancy at KFS, Samuel Ihure, planting a tree at Kinale forest as Kiambu ecosystem conservator Paul Karanja speaks while standing last week on Wednesday.
Head of Central highlands conservancy at KFS, Samuel Ihure, planting a tree at Kinale forest as Kiambu ecosystem conservator Paul Karanja speaks while standing last week on Wednesday.
Image: GEORGE MUGO

People living near Kinale forest in Kiambu county have asked the Kenya Forest Service to allocate them land for cultivation.

A resident, James Kiragu, asked the KFS to consider allocating them the area where the KDF officers planted indigenous cider trees last week on Wednesday.

However, the head of Central highlands conservancy at KFS Samuel Ihure said locals will be allocated lands elsewhere since the local grass in the forest competes for nutrients with anything planted.

"We all know that grass competes with everything growing. Locals will definitely get pieces of lands, where they will grow foods as they take care of our trees. Once the trees are full grown, that is after three years, they leave," he said.

He spoke at Kinale forest, where he led KDF officers to plant 2,500 cider trees, at a 25-hectare land.

Present were lieutenant colonel, Joseph Yator and lieutenant colonel Stanley Kithuva, commandant school of transport.

Others were Kinale forestor Simon Mwema, and Kiambu region ecosystem conservator Paul Karanja.

Mweka said the exercise saw over 25 hectares of degraded forest land rehabilitated.