IN SORRY STATE

Kiambu tea farmers want county to repair roads

The most affected areas are Kagwe, Gachoire, Ciboni and Gatamaiyu.

In Summary

• Farmers said the roads are in a sorry state because of the rain experienced in most parts of the country.

• Kagwe Tea Factory director Gichuha wa Chege has asked the county government to pass Tea Cess Bill so that they can repair roads.

Lari for Larians Initiative group chairman Paul Ngunyi (in glasses) hands over food to Lari DCC Aaron Koros in Kimende. Kagwe Tea Factory director Gichuha wa Chege is standing behind Koros
Lari for Larians Initiative group chairman Paul Ngunyi (in glasses) hands over food to Lari DCC Aaron Koros in Kimende. Kagwe Tea Factory director Gichuha wa Chege is standing behind Koros
Image: /GEORGE MUGO

Tea farmers in Kiambu have asked the county government to rehabilitate the roads used to transport the cash crop.

The farmers said the roads are in a sorry state because of the rains experienced in most parts of the country.

“We have the worst roads. They are full of potholes and vehicles break down all the time. We have complained about the issue to both national and county governments, but nothing has been done,” tea farmer Joseph Mwangi said.

 

He said the affected areas are Kagwe, Gachoire, Ciboni and Gatamaiyu.

Kagwe Tea Factory director Gichuha wa Chege has asked the county government to pass Tea Cess Bill so that they can repair roads.

He said they are forced to slash farmers' proceeds to facilitate road repairs.

“Every year, we have been cutting our farmers money for repairing roads, something that is not supposed to happen, but we discussed and got consent from them to do so,” Chege said.

He said the coronavirus has affected many businesses, factories and industries, with workers being sent home as they are not making profits.

Chege spoke when joined Lari for Larians Initiative (LLI) group to donate food worth Sh250,000 to vulnerable families.

He was accompanied by LLI chairman Paul Ngunyi and other officials such as Njoki Wamitugo, musician Charles Manji and Kamau Mariga to present food donation to Lari deputy county commissioner Aaron Koros.

 

Chege said 95 per cent of tea grown in Kenya is exported, leaving Kenyans consuming only five per cent. He urged residents to develop a culture of drinking tea.

Chege reveals that scientists believe that tea grown in Kiambu was among the best in the world and it has some elements that boost the immune system.

Edited by A.N