TECH TALK

You can explore the world using Google's Timelapse

It is the largest video on the planet

In Summary
  • It has 24 million satellite photos from the past 37 years which have been compiled into an interactive 4D experience.
  • The videos on Timelapse are like art and you can take a step back and remember that we need to protect our planet.

Google Earth has been an application that billions of people have turned to, to explore the planet from endless vantage points.

After an update on this application, you can now see the earth in an entirely new dimension, which is time.

 Timelapse in Google Earth has 24 million satellite photos from the past 37 years that have been compiled into an interactive 4D experience.

It will give you a clear picture of our changing planet right from your device or smartphone. It not only shows problems but also solutions and the beautiful natural phenomena that unfold over decades.

Google Earth will take you on a guided tour of five topics that are forest change, urban growth, warming temperatures, source of energy and our world’s fragile beauty.

For teachers, reporters, students or an explorer, you can use this app to look at places you care about. What you need to do is use the search bar function to zero in on a region you really know well.

Seeing the changes at a more personal level contextualizes what global environmental change actually means right now and what it could mean in the future of your local community.

You can look for patterns with this app. Patterns are everywhere and you can see how the same trends such as rapid changes from wildfires taking place across the world. You can start with curated videos from Google that show the story of change then you can look at other trends you see happening across the world.

This can be an exercise in unity to see what communities are experiencing here and elsewhere and see how these changes can affect communities and ecosystems.

The videos on Timelapse are like art and you can take a step back and remember that we need to protect our planet.

Whether you are marveling at changing coastlines, following the growth of megacities, or tracking deforestation, it is important to have this application at the palm of your hands.

Timelapse in Google earth is about zooming out to assess the health and well-being of our only planet and it is a tool that can educate as well as inspire action.

The visual evidence can cut to the core of the debate in a way that words cannot and communicate complex issues to everyone.

Pixel crunching in Earth Engine, Google’s cloud platform for geospatial analysis was used in making a planet-sized Timelapse video. Timelapse in Google Earth is the largest video on the planet. Creating it required world collaboration.

NASA and the United States Geological Survey’s Landsat program, the world’s first civilian Earth Observation program and the European Union’s Copernicus program with its Sentinel satellites played a huge role in this collaboration.