REBRANDING

Kenya Meat Commission adopts new marketing plan to boost sales

The disruption in demand caused by the pandemic saw meat prices in the country hike

In Summary
  • The dealer has now started selling meat in across estates in the country as it seeks more clients and higher sales.
  • Most barbeque grills along the country’s major highways and by-pass towns had to shut down, but as the restrictions were eased the joints are now reopening.
A butchery attendant prepares meat for sale
TABLES TURNING: A butchery attendant prepares meat for sale
Image: FILE

Rundown state meat processor,  Kenya Meat Commission has reviewed its marketing strategy to recover from the low sales brought about by the Covid-19 pandemic.

The dealer has now started direct sales in estates in the country as it seeks more clients and higher sales.

“Welcome to KMC Estate van sales, you're welcome to take advantage of our quality products at very affordable prices,” read a Whatsapp message from the one of the sales representative of the commission.

 

Lillian Wanyama said the van would have a variety of meat products. 

The onset of the pandemic in March saw various restrictions and stay at home directives set to curb the spread of the disease, these saw many nyama choma joints shut affecting meat suppliers.

Most barbecue grills along the country’s major highways and by-pass towns had to shut down, but as the restrictions were eased they are now reopening.

The disruption in demand caused by the pandemic saw meat prices in the country hike by Sh100-200 in most areas.

The livestock bred for meat largely procured from arid and semi-arid areas whose economies were hit hard, saw low supply of the commodity therefore dealers had to re-strategise.

KMC has been struggling to clear money owed to farmers as well as other suppliers.

It has now cleared the bulk of debts it owed livestock farmers since it was taken over by the military in September.

 

Interior Cabinet Secretary Fred Matiang’i said the takeover has seen a 30 per cent increase in the number of livestock supplied to the Athi River-based plant.

The entity in the year to June 2020 posted a loss of Sh100 million from a revenue of Sh174 million, according to a National Treasury report. Its net assets stood at Sh1.54 billion in June.

President Kenyatta’s directive on the handover of KMC to the military in September drew criticism  and questions on the legality of the move but Matiang’i dismissed this as an unhealthy obsession with processes at the expense of results.

He said under the military watch, KMC has put an end to the recurrent practice of sinking public funds to keep it afloat.

The CS said the government is planning to invest more in livestock to create jobs and revenue opportunities for a sector that currently contributes 12 per cent to the GDP and employs half of the agriculture labour force.