SENSITIZATION

EPRA launches campaign on safe use of cooking gas

The Regulations, or Legal Notice No. 100 of 2019, were gazetted on June 25 2019 in alignment with the provisions of section 101 of The Petroleum Act 2019

In Summary
  • Dubbed Stori ya Gas, the campaign will sensitize traders, consumers and other stakeholders on the Petroleum LPG Regulations, 2019, that underscore consumer safety and fair competition in the industry.
  • According to data from EPRA, the country has recorded more than twelve accidents involving gas cylinder explosions over the last two years attributed to poor handling of gas cylinders.
LPG gas cylinders.
LPG gas cylinders.
Image: FILE

The Energy and Petroleum Regulatory Authority (EPRA) has launched a campaign to promote safe use of Liquefied Petroleum Gas (LPG) in the country.

Dubbed Stori ya Gas, the campaign will sensitise traders, consumers and other stakeholders on the Petroleum LPG Regulations, 2019, that underscore consumer safety and fair competition in the industry.

Notable safety measures being implemented under the regulations include tracking of cylinders throughout the distribution chain and the ban of gas cylinders that bear no brand names in order to enhance accountability and traceability as well as insurance of consumers against gas related accidents.

The regulations also require brand owners to educate consumers on safe handling and use of LPG through instructions affixed onto the cylinder as well as indicate the tare and gross weights of the gas cylinder on the body of the cylinder.

“The 2019 regulations will revolutionise and sanitise the LPG sector in the country and will also bring order and fair play in the industry while tackling perennial challenges such as illegal refiling and rebranding of gas cylinders,” said Pavel Oimeke, Director General, EPRA.

 
 

The Regulations, were gazetted on June 25 2019 and took full effect on March 31 2020 after expiry of a 9-month transition period.

According to data from EPRA, the country has recorded more than twelve accidents involving gas cylinder explosions over the last two years attributed to poor handling of gas cylinders.

“We encourage consumers to only purchase their gas from licensed LPG retailers and at the point of sale, they should witness weighing of the cylinder and compare the resulting weight with the gross weight indicated on the body of the cylinder,” said Oimeke.