CLINCHING BIG TENDERS

Understand PPP jargon to benefit, professionals told

Know the language of PPPs

In Summary

• There is still a significant gap between the country’s need for infrastructure and critical services and the government’s ability to pay for such investments.

• The African Development Bank (AfDB) projects a growth of 30 per cent for African economies by 2040.

Dr Eustace Mwarania,chairman of Trapos Africa and Likoni Cable Express Project
Dr Eustace Mwarania,chairman of Trapos Africa and Likoni Cable Express Project
Image: courtesy

To participate in major government projects, professionals must have a wide knowledge base in Public-Private Partnerships.

This includes understanding the legal, fund-raising, and procurement dynamics of PPP’s in order to compete with foreign contractors.

 

“Understanding how to design a successful PPP is crucial as it will help our local professionals to have a stronger presence in PPP projects in the energy, transport and social sectors,” said Architectural Association of Kenya (AAK) president Mugure Njendu in an interview.

Their ability to decode jargon and show the possibility of undertaking such projects will also encourage the government to engage local contractors.

The growth in local infrastructure will only be sustainable if we close the capacity, skills and knowledge gaps on the PPP process and its legal, financial and commercial aspects.
Rose Kananu, MD Howard Aidevo.

She said local architects, engineers, quantity surveyors and procurement professionals should equip themselves with the right knowledge to address the challenges faced when applying for PPPs.

The local private sector continues to shun PPPs claiming difficulties encountered at various levels of execution, including financing, requisite manpower, and ability to carry the project to completion on time.

There is still a significant gap between the country’s need for infrastructure anThe African Development Bank (AfDB) projects a growth of 30 per cent for African economies by 2040.​_d critical services like hospitals compared to the government’s ability to pay for such investments.

The African Development Bank (AfDB) projects a growth of 30 per cent for African economies by 2040. PPPs that are initiated by local professionals can be a homegrown solution to the challenge.

 

Eustace Mwarania, chairman of Trapos Africa and the Likoni cable express project said securing the right project financing and management expertise is crucial to ensuring that a PPP is successfully executed.