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PLAYERS HIT HARD

Covid-19 pandemic throw footballers in self-examination

Doping received very little attention from players.

In Summary

• Other areas of interest were players’ contracts, business model canvas, injury management, menstrual hygiene and mental health

•Lessons drawn from players’ submissions in the poll include improving on the way they live, their hygiene, spending and saving culture

Erick Lusala (L) Talanta tackles Joshua Ouko of Coast Stima in recent match
Erick Lusala (L) Talanta tackles Joshua Ouko of Coast Stima in recent match
Image: OLIVER MORGAN

Players in the country want training in sports development and economic empowerment, according to a survey on the impact of Covid-19 pandemic.

Other areas of interest were players’ contracts, business model canvas, injury management, menstrual hygiene and mental health. Doping received very little attention from players.

The survey conducted by Kenya Footballers Welfare Association between April 11 and May 6 sampled 136 football players (men and women) drawn from Kenya Premier League, FKF Women’s Premier League, National Super League, National Division One and other lower tiers. Also featured in the survey were female coaches and referees.

The polls also revealed that a huge percentage of players did not have any alternative income stream apart from their club salary. This, the survey revealed had put the players in perilous situation financially since their clubs are unable to remit their monthly dues.

“They are slowly realising the need for extra sources of income outside football. This has pushed some of them into taking up new activities as sources of income such as farming, online writing and a lot of hand work within their communities as a means to earn a living,” the report read in part.

Only 21.6 per cent of the sample population were reported to have alternative source of income. Male players listed activities like coaching, teaching, financial advisory, graffiti, businesses and agriculture as alternative sources while their female counterparts cited hairdressing, teaching and transport industry.

“We have partnered with some organisations with the view to train players in various sectors and we believe this will help us address most of the issues raised in the survey. It is good players have identified their own needs and the polls have shown their priorities,” said Jerry Santo, Kefwa secretary general.

Lessons drawn from players’ submissions in the poll include improving on the way they live, their hygiene, spending and saving culture and general preparedness for emergencies and the future.