Sonko's confessions shine spotlight on role of crime in politics

Governors Ferdinand Waititu (Kiambu) and Mike Sonko (Nairobi). COURTESY
Governors Ferdinand Waititu (Kiambu) and Mike Sonko (Nairobi). COURTESY

Nairobi Governor Mike Sonko's TV interview mid this week is shining the spotlight on the role of crime in the rise of many politicians.

The big question is whether crime, especially that which is likely to gain you a lot of wealth, has become a stepping stone to political leadership in the country?

It’s an open secret that many people with questionable character have risen to political offices mainly due to the publicity and accumulated wealth.

Sonko admitted he has a past in crime and argues that this gives him an upper hand in tackling crime and "cartels".

He confessed that he has even been arrested and has spent time in three prison facilities in Kenya.

These confessions ignited reactions from Kenyans on Twitter especially to the fact that he admitted smoking bhang Parliament, which is a criminal offence.

Read:

Possession of Bhang or Marijuana is a crime in Kenya and a government official admitting how he did this in government buildings may just show

how much law favours the powerful.

Twitter users animatedly contributed to the debate with some saying Sonko had answered the curiosity of many Kenyans on the governor's involvement in substance abuse.

The host of the interview looked like he wanted to stay away from the debate but was surprised by Sonko dragging a fellow governor and former MP into the bhang smuggling claim.

This also came as a surprise to many Kenyans on Twitter going by the animated debate that followed with many posting Memes of shocked faces.

Another surprise was the governor claiming to have returned all that he had accumulated during his days he confessed of having been involved in crime.

As this debate continues, it will be curious to see whether the law can provide any recourse to arrest crimes that were committed before someone took office.