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September 25, 2018

EACC should pursue these rogue governors

Nation newspaper Homa Bay-based journalist Barack Oduor shows injuries he sustained after he jumped out of a car he had been bundled into by abductors on Monday. Sharon Otieno, the second victim was found dead on Wednesday. /ROBERT OMOLLO
Nation newspaper Homa Bay-based journalist Barack Oduor shows injuries he sustained after he jumped out of a car he had been bundled into by abductors on Monday. Sharon Otieno, the second victim was found dead on Wednesday. /ROBERT OMOLLO

Some governors have become involved in thuggish incidents recently.

Threats, beating up opponents, eliminating trouble makers, assassination - this is the stuff of the news these days.

There are some upright governors like Prof Anyang’ Nyong’o of Kisumu and Prof Kivutha Kibwana of Makueni but it seems that some others are going rogue.

The Ethics and Anti-Corruption Commission has its hands full with fraud and bribery cases at the moment.

But the EACC is also constitutionally mandated to tackle ethical issues and some governors are clearly breaching the provisions of Chapter Six on Leadership and Integrity — in particular clause 75 (1) c on “demeaning the office the officer holds”.

There is a limit to what the EACC can do with rogue governors. They can only be removed if the county assembly impeaches them.

But that does not stop the EACC from investigating or prosecuting them. The commission should extend its operations to interviewing governors in cases of serious misbehaviour, and, if necessary, seeking their prosecution in the courts of law.

Quote of the day: "'Apartheid' means ‘something of your own’."

Hendrik Verwoerd

The South African Prime Minister was stabbed to death on September 6, 1966.

 

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