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October 22, 2018

Kamworor all set: New York Marathon champion to defend title in November

Geoffrey Kipsang Kamworor of Kenya leads the pack in the men's 10,000 metres final during the 15th IAAF World Championships at the National Stadium in Beijing, China August 22, 2015.  REUTERS/Dylan Martinez
Geoffrey Kipsang Kamworor of Kenya leads the pack in the men's 10,000 metres final during the 15th IAAF World Championships at the National Stadium in Beijing, China August 22, 2015. REUTERS/Dylan Martinez

New York City Marathon champion Geoffrey Kamworor will defend his title on November 4.

During last year’s race, Kamworor claimed his first major marathon victory when he held off a challenge from compatriot Wilson Kipsang down the final turns in Central Park. The 2015 runner-up separated himself from the field with a 4:31 penultimate mile to finish in 2:10:53.

The Kenyan has won the past three World Half Marathon Championships and recorded three consecutive sub-2:07 performances at the Berlin Marathon from 2012-2014, with his 2:06:12 clocking from 2012 remaining his personal best.

“Racing once more at the New York City Marathon means so much to me,” said the three-time world cross-country champion. “It is my favourite race and although thousands of miles separate my training base in Kaptagat, Kenya with New York, the event feels like home.”

Sharlene Flanagan will be defending the women’s crown. Flanagan became the first US woman to win in New York since Miki Gorman in 1977.

She ended a 40-year drought for the US by dethroning Kenya’s Mary Keitany in a time of 2:26:53. With her first victory in just her second appearance at the event — runner-up in her marathon debut in 2010 — Flanagan became the sixth US women’s champion in the event.

The 16-time national champion and Olympic silver medallist will join previously announced Des Linden, the 2018 Boston Marathon champion and Allie Kieffer, the fifth-place finisher in New York last year.

“When I think about returning to race in New York City, I’m flooded with magical memories,” said Flanagan. “My heart skips a beat. I get butterflies in my stomach and my palms get sweaty. New York City is incredibly special to me. It’s where I ran my first marathon in 2010, placing second, and of course, my dream-come-true moment in 2017 when I won.”

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