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November 17, 2018

Njagua opposes bringing down Kamkunji structures

Starehe MP Charles Njagua running from a rowdy crowd after their stalls were demolished by the city county askaris at the Bus Station Stage on Wednesday 11th April, 2018./Collins Langat
Starehe MP Charles Njagua running from a rowdy crowd after their stalls were demolished by the city county askaris at the Bus Station Stage on Wednesday 11th April, 2018./Collins Langat

Starehe MP Charles Njagua has rejected the planned demolishing structures on riparian land within Kamukunji.

He said this will leave people homeless as the plan does not provide an alternative.

Speaking to the Star in Nairobi yesterday, Njagua said pushing residents 30 metres away is not in good faith as the required distance is six metres.

"If we know the required distance from the river is six metres and you want to demolish structures 30 metres away, that is unfair," he said.

The MP said for instance, the area around Gikomba houses around 200,000 people who got allotment letters and title deeds from the county government.

He said others have build houses.

Njagua urged the national and county governments to cancel all allotment letters and title deeds before demolitions.

“I am more concerned about people who have structures around the rivers. The demolitions should start from the source, not just pulling down buildings without following procedure,” he said.

Njagua said he will raise the issue in the National Assembly on Tuesday because residents will lose their livelihoods if the demolitions continue.

He urged the county leaders to fight for the rights of citizens on their hour of need.

Njagua said he will discuss with President Uhuru Kenyatta ways of preventing such demolitions.

"I will speak to the President as you are the people who elected him. I will try talk to him to stop this plan as I know it will render people homeless," he added.

In 2015, the government endorsed a decision to demolish all buildings built on river banks and riparian land in Nairobi, a decision that could see some investors lose millions of shillings in investments.

The decision to bring down the buildings came after the increased flooding experienced in parts of Nairobi where structures built along waterways were blamed for impeding the flow of the water.

Nairobi ward representatives then demanded that a Sh1 billion building under construction opposite T-Mall be demolished, claiming it affected the flow of Mutuini-Ngong River, causing flooding whenever it rains.

The Land Act defines a riparian reserve as land adjacent to an ocean, lake, sea, rivers, dams and water courses. The law demands that a minimum six metre reserve be left between the highest water point of a river and any development undertaken.

 

 

 

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