Uhuru appoints ex-Rift Valley regional coordinator to lead fight against fakes | The Star, Kenya Skip to main content
August 19, 2018

Uhuru appoints ex-Rift Valley regional coordinator to lead fight against fakes

A box of counterfeit emergency contraceptive pills which were seized during a raid at the Embakasi ICD in Nairobi, May 6, 2018. /COURTESY
A box of counterfeit emergency contraceptive pills which were seized during a raid at the Embakasi ICD in Nairobi, May 6, 2018. /COURTESY

President Uhuru Kenyatta has appointed former Rift Valley regional coordinator Wanyama Musiambu to lead efforts to rid the country of counterfeit goods.

The president made the declaration during a round table at State House on May 10.

Musiambu, who is now deputy Head of Public Service, has been handed the Herculean responsibility of curtailing corruption which is the key facilitator of illicit trade in Kenya.

Apart from counterfeits, he will also deal with fake business stickers, dumping and entry of fake goods through all ports of entry, mainly through the port of Mombasa.

The move is likely to come as a relief to consumers who are concerned about an uncontrolled influx of fake products being sold in Kenya lately.

Recently, the anti-counterfeit agency, together with security agencies, seized a consignment of emergency contraceptives at the Inland Container Depot in Embakasi in Nairobi.

Corruption in authorities tasked to control import or dumping of fakes in the country is blamed for the infiltration of such goods.

On this, the president has emphasised the need for a multi-sectoral approach to deal with corruption incorporating the private and public sectors; the judiciary and legislature.

"We must say enough is enough because the vice has the potential to undermine the Big Four and completely destroy Kenya," he said at the event.

Counterfeits have become commonplace in Kenya in the wake of citizens not being in a position to tell the difference between the fakes and the original goods.

Industrialisation CS Adan Mohamed, during the recent Embakasi ICD raid, said: "The goods may sometimes achieve the set standards but they are still counterfeit by the fact that the manufacturers are not the IP owners of the brand."

Pirated goods that find their way into Kenya most times include electronics among them phones, leather products and medical items, whose trade costs manufactures losses amounting in billions of shillings. 

Click here for the latest political news

 

Poll of the day