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November 19, 2018

Which way kip? : London Marathon winner says world mark is still high on his agenda

Britain's Prince Harry with Kenya's Vivian Cheruiyot after winning the Women's elite race and Kenya's Eliud Kipchoge after winning the Men's elite race .REUTERS/Paul Childs
Britain's Prince Harry with Kenya's Vivian Cheruiyot after winning the Women's elite race and Kenya's Eliud Kipchoge after winning the Men's elite race .REUTERS/Paul Childs

Olympic champion Eliud Kipchoge has set his sights on breaking Dennis Kimetto world record in the 42km race event after missing the mark by two minutes 20 seconds in London on Sunday.

The three-time London marathon champion came close to breaking Kimetto’s record last year in Berlin, where he clocked 2:03:32. He said Kimetto’s record remain high on his agenda and revealed that he wants to prolong his career to the 2020 Olympics in Tokyo, where he will be defending his title.

“Where I come from in Kenya, we say, ‘just unwrap it’,” he said when asked about the world record. “So after London, now I plan where to go.”

“Where I come from in Kenya, we say, ‘just unwrap it’,” he said when asked about the world record. “So after London, now I plan where to go,” added Kipchoge.

Kipchoge clocked 2:04:17 to win the coveted London Marathon title. “I can say I enjoyed the race. I enjoyed the race very much,” said Kipchoge.

“I still enjoyed the win, and I’m happy to be able to win for the third time in London,” he added.

The former world champion at 5,000m champion was worried about the dogged resistance of runner up Shura Kitata of Ethiopia and It was not until the 24th mile, covered in 4:44, that Kipchoge finally broke Kitata and a smile began to show as he crested the rise out of the tunnel on to the Embankment.

“At some point, I was a little bit worried,” said Kipchoge, acknowledging the resolve shown by his Ethiopian rival. “But I had to fight in the last kilometres.”

Kipchoge has won nine out 10 marathons since 2013 with his only defeat coming against Wilson Kipsang in the 2013 Berlin Marathon, where he was placed second.

Women’s winner Vivian Cheruiyot stunned a competitive field to win her second marathon.

Cheruiyot said she was chastened by her debut last year when she paid the price for an over-exuberant first half but the 34-year-old duly learned from that experience, running consistent splits of 1:08:56 and 1:09:34 to cross the finish-line on The Mall in 2:18:31, moving to fourth on the world all-time list still headed by Radcliffe’s mark from 15 years ago.

Cheruiyot was delighted with the victory and race tactics. “When I saw Dibaba, I had enough energy and I thought: “I’m going to get her.” After that, I saw Mary, and I got her, and I thought: “Yes, today I am going to be a winner of the London Marathon—and I’m so happy.”

She won her first marathon last year in Frankfurt last year in 2:23:35 after finishing fourth in London in 2:23:50 six month earlier.

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