Skip to main content
December 18, 2017

200 Kamiti inmates undergo training to prevent return to crime

Kamiti Maximum Prison. /JOSEPH NDUNDA
Kamiti Maximum Prison. /JOSEPH NDUNDA

Some 200 inmates from Kamiti Maximum Prison will undergo rehabilitation to curb relapses into criminal activities.

The programme targets inmates left with between six months to one year of their prison term.

It is a partnership between Kenya Prisons Service and the International Youth Fellowship who signed an MoU to give Curriculum on Mind Education to wardens and inmates.

So far, IYF had trained 2,400 prison service cadets from Ruiru prison college, 20 senior officers at the national headquarters and 400 inmates at Ruiru prison.

The training is structured in a curriculum that runs for one year and involves lectures, group discussions, and presentations by the prisoners. 

Senior Deputy Commissioner Wanini Cheriri said they intend to train more than 50,000 inmates and the programme will be rolled out to all the 119 prisons countrywide.

 "By the end of one year the trained inmates will graduate and become mind education specialist where the Kenya Prisons Service will then use them to train others under supervision of IYF Mind Education Specialists," read a statement. 

The programme will later be inculcated into the prison staff training curriculum. 

Thursday's event also saw the opening of a theology school within Kamiti prison where some 100 inmates will enrol.

Reformed inmate Kim Ki-Sung, now a pastor and a mind specialist, said relapsing into criminal behavior can be curbed through proper learning of the bible and systematic theology if the rights skills are applied. 

Recidivism in Kenya is estimated to be about two thirds, which means that two thirds of inmates will go back to prison after their release. 

Read: 100 inmates at Naivasha GK get Theology training

Click here for latest political news

 

STAR COMMUNITY POLICY AND PARTICIPATION GUIDLINES
  • Thank you for participating in discussions on The Star, Kenya website. You are welcome to comment and debate issues, however take note that:
  • Comments that are abusive; defamatory; obscene; promote or incite violence, terrorism, illegal acts, hate speech, or hatred on the grounds of race, ethnicity, cultural identity, religious belief, disability, gender, identity or sexual orientation, or are otherwise objectionable in the Star’s  reasonable discretion shall not be tolerated and will be deleted.
  • Comments that contain unwarranted personal abuse will be deleted.
  • Strong personal criticism is acceptable if justified by facts and arguments.
  • Deviation from points of discussion may lead to deletion of comments.
  • Failure to adhere to this policy and guidelines may lead to blocking of offending users. Our moderator’s decision to block offending users is final.
Poll of the day