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September 19, 2018

How creativity can position you for that grand online income

People busy on computers. More Kenyans are currently poised to earn a living through creative works shared online. \VICTOR IMBOTO
People busy on computers. More Kenyans are currently poised to earn a living through creative works shared online. \VICTOR IMBOTO

The internet continues to be a boom for creators, their communities, and the content industry which, if used properly, can massively enhance one's creativity in all areas of work and life.

People make millions of shillings with their creativity online, keeping in mind that the cost of creative failure is minimal.

On the internet, people express themselves in one way or another, connecting with those they know; they also meet strangers, learn from others and create relationships.

Within just a few clicks, we can view creative works of skilled dozens of people.

This is because the barrier to entry is almost nil and the number of creative outlets we can express ourselves with is mind-boggling.

So does the Internet threaten creativity or nurture it?

When we think about the internet, we think of many things, from websites, blogs, social networks, social media and many other avenues.

Effective mechanisms to balance between “sharing online” and the “copyright protection” in the digital environment, under the existing legal systems are key to ensure that creativity is recognized and rewarded effectively.

Content ID is a great example of this, whose laws according to the Kenya Copyright Board, should be implemented in line with the international treaties and conventions they subscribe to.

Kenya is a party to these global laws which relate to copyright and other rights recognized by the Act.

The purpose of copyright registration is to place on record a verifiable account of the date and content of the work in question, so that in the event of a legal claim, or case of infringement or plagiarism, the copyright owner can produce a copy of the work from an official government source.

According to Google's communication manager for East and sub-Saharan Africa Dorothy Ooko, content ID goes beyond a simple "notice-and-takedown" system to provide a set of automated tools that empowers rights holders to automatically claim their content and choose whether to track, block or monetize it.

"Content ID is a highly effective solution, and today over 98 per cent of copyright management on YouTube takes place through Content ID, with only 2 per cent being handled through copyright removal notices," said Dorothy.

According to statistics from Google, well over 90 per cent of all Content ID claims across the platform result in monetization.

The music industry mostly chooses to monetize more than 95 per cent of their claims, opting to leave the content up on the platform.

Thanks to Content ID, sites like YouTube give partners an automated way to directly monetize background or incidental use and covers.

The advantage of the internet is open communication.

For people with blogs, sharing their thoughts enables them to create conversations or sentiments that may be shared by other like minded people.

The best way to battle piracy is to employ better, more convenient, legitimate alternatives.

Rogue sites that specialize in online piracy are commercial ventures, which means that one effective way to combat them is to cut off their money supply.

"The music industry for instance chooses to monetize more than 95 per cent of their claims, opting to leave the content up on the platform. Half of the music industry's YouTube revenue comes from fan content claimed via Content ID," said Dorothy.

"Connecting fans to better legitimate alternatives by helping users legitimately discover, purchase, and enjoy music, movies, books, magazines, and Apps is key form us at Google," she added.

Content ID is a highly effective solution, and today, according to a report by Google, over 98 per cent of copyright management on platforms like YouTube takes place through Content ID, with only 2 per cent being handled through copyright removal notices.

Platforms like Google Play has paid out more than $7 billion to developers whereby by they get to create Apps and get money from the downloads they get.

"Young people mostly developers should make use of the internet so as to be able to generate income more-so in Kenya where the rate of unemployment is low among the youth," said Dorothy.

Protecting and fostering creativity online is a priority for any corporation. Investing in efforts to address copyright infringement online, collaborating with rights holders and protecting the interests of users should be on the forefront.

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