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November 17, 2018

EACC plans random integrity checks and lifestyle audits

Former Judge Aaron Ringera with EACC Chairman Phillip Kinisu at Kenya School of Government , Nairobi yesterday during the Office of the Attorney General and Department of Justice Colloquium for State Counsel. Photo/Monicah Mwangi
Former Judge Aaron Ringera with EACC Chairman Phillip Kinisu at Kenya School of Government , Nairobi yesterday during the Office of the Attorney General and Department of Justice Colloquium for State Counsel. Photo/Monicah Mwangi

The Ethics and Anti-Corruption Commission will carry out random integrity checks in suspect ministries.

The checks, EACC chairman Philip Kinisu said, will be conducted in ministries where cases of corruption are prevalent.

He said the EACC is developing a system on how the checks will be done.

Part of the plan is to audit public servants’ lifestyles.

“I know we cannot completely eliminate the vice (corruption), but we will definitely do something about it. This fight is not a one-off event but a process,” Kinisu said.

The EACC chairman said the commission is pursuing alternative dispute resolution mechanisms to reduce the backlog of cases.

He said the commission has recorded 55,000 complaints, 13,000 of the cases fall within it’s mandate.

“We encourage those who have committed offences to come forward and if they meet certain conditions, the sanctions will be less punitive,” Kinisu said.

He spoke during a meeting for state counsels from the Attorney General’s office and those of the justice department, at the Kenya School of Government.

Former chairman of the (now defunct) Kenya Anti-Corruption Commission Aaron Ringera said the AG has been busy in legislating on corruption, but Kenyans are not assisting.

“It saddens one that many of those charged with the critical responsibility of dealing with corruption want to do much for the country.

But they are being fought from all angles because of different personal interests, and the cycle continues,” he said.

Ringera challenged the AG’s office to be keen on contracts they endorse because illegal clauses could be inserted and go unnoticed.

“Check carefully on the securities, penalties, wordings and other details.  That is where things are hidden,” he said.

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