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Saturday, July 22, 2017

Sanofi, General Electric team up to train clinicians treating diabetes patients

"Sanofi and General Electric Healthcare will offer a two-month training program to clinicians, aimed at improving the quality of life of people living with diabetes and cardiovascular diseases." /RHODA ODHIAMBO
"Sanofi and General Electric Healthcare will offer a two-month training program to clinicians, aimed at improving the quality of life of people living with diabetes and cardiovascular diseases." /RHODA ODHIAMBO

Sanofi and General Electric Healthcare will offer a two-month training program to clinicians, aimed at improving the quality of life of people living with diabetes and cardiovascular diseases.

Clinicians working in the country will be the first beneficiaries of this training in East Africa.

Sanofi general manager Peter Munyasi said the program targets clinicians attending to patients suffering from non communicable diseases as they already have enough background knowledge.

“The training will mostly be heavily based on skills development. We are trying to avoid the normal way of teaching; 70 per cent of the training will be hands on,” he said.

The two-month training will involve practical lessons and webinar sessions.

John Kibachio, head of the non communicable disease unit at the Health ministry, lauded lauded the initiative and vowed to work with the two partners to prevent new cases of people diagnoses with diabetes and cardiovascular diseases.

He said the ministry will ensure that those diagnosed with the same get quality care and treatment.

“These are the diseases that are killing our people. They are robbing our banks in terms of the cost of managing the diseases,” Kibachio said.

Lifestyle changes

Nearly one million people in Kenya are diabetic. The young and middle-class are more susceptible to diabetes due to poor lifestyle habits such as eating of junk food, having fewer vegetables and/or fruits on their plate, and sedentary lifestyles.

Health experts are concerned with the number of cases diagnosed too late as diabetic patients risk going blind, heart and kidney failure or even death.

Globally, diabetes is a growing healthcare problem.

“Every eight seconds a life is lost as a result of diabetes and after every 30 seconds, a limb is chopped off,” Munyasi added.

According to the International Diabetes Federation, a diabetic patient requires three times more health resources than a non-diabetic.

Diabetes is also seen as one cause of disability, amputations and resources in African countries will be diverted for treatment for diabetic patients.

Diabetes and cardiovascular diseases lead to premature mortality and needed to be reduced by one-third according to the Sustainable Development Goals.

Kibachio added for non communicable diseases to be eradicated, they need to be looked at as a developmental issue as they cripple the country’s economy.

“For NCDs it is not about swallowing tablets, it is about controlling the sugar, controlling the hypertension and putting long term conditions at bay," Kibachio added.


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