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Saturday, March 25, 2017

Boinnet urged to transfer North Rift security officers over crime

women carry relief handouts donated to them by Kenya Red-cross at Moinonin, Baringo North sub-county in Baringo on Saturday. Over 3,300 hungry rsidents go without food and water in the county amid banditry attacks. PHOTO/JOSEPH KANGOGO
women carry relief handouts donated to them by Kenya Red-cross at Moinonin, Baringo North sub-county in Baringo on Saturday. Over 3,300 hungry rsidents go without food and water in the county amid banditry attacks. PHOTO/JOSEPH KANGOGO

Civil Society Groups want the Interior ministry and IG Joseph Boinnet to transfer all security chiefs in the North Rift for being an impediment to ending bandit attacks.

The Police Reforms Working Group Kenya and the Baringo Human Rights Consortium want all officers in Baringo, Elgeyo Marakwet and Laikipia counties transferred.

The CSOs yesterday said county commissioners and their deputies, county and divisional police commanders and their AP counterparts have not comprehensively addressed the insecurity.

They said Parliament’s National Administration and Security chairman Asman Kamama should step aside or resign to pave way for investigations into the sporadic attacks that have left more than 6,000 people displaced and more than 10,000 livestock stolen.

Several people have been killed and injured.

The sporadic attacks by armed bandits and cattle rustlers have led to the death two politicians — Loyamorok MCA Fredrick Cheretei and Tiaty MP aspirant Pepee Kitambaa — and Kapendusum Primary School teacher Philemon Chetalam Kemei.

Two police reservists, Ngororo chief Thomas Chebor and Sosian ranch director Tristan Voorspuy have also been killed.

“We demand the immediate recovery of all the 10,705 livestock stolen by armed groups, bandits and cattle rustlers as soon as possible to enable the affected communities sustain their livelihood,” group convener Lawrence Kiplagat said.

He said 2,740 cows, 7,933 goats and sheep and 42 donkeys have been stolen.

Kiplagat said the ongoing operations to restore law and order should have a clear and comprehensive mechanism for disarmament. It is feared there are between 5,000 and 6,000 illegal guns in the region.

He spoke at a Nairobi hotel during a joint media briefing with police reforms working groups.

Kiplagat urged the government to set up more police facilities within the region and deploy more police officers to ensure that peace and stability prevail.

“We demand that the ongoing investigations by the police to establish those responsible be concluded as a matter of urgency and lead to prosecution of those culpable, regardless of the office or titles they hold,” he said.

“We recommend that the national and county governments, Parliament and the county assemblies concerned investigate and initiate disciplinary action against any of their members linked with these sporadic incidents of insecurity. This should include suspension from responsibilities that could hamper investigations.”

The groups urged the government, CSOs, the private sector and the public to take measures for assistance and protection of IDPs and help victims in creating a conducive environment for children to access quality education and better health services.

Kiplagat called for a transparent, consultative and comprehensive compensation scheme to cover all forms of losses suffered and provide durable solutions to victims.


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